Mar
10
Sun
“Impact: Contemporary Artists at the Hermitage Artist Retreat” @ Sarasota Art Museum
Mar 10 @ 10:00 am – Jul 7 @ 5:00 pm
"Impact: Contemporary Artists at the Hermitage Artist Retreat" @ Sarasota Art Museum

“Impact: Contemporary Artists at the Hermitage Artist Retreat”

Presented in partnership with Sarasota Art Museum 

Sunday, March 10 – Sunday, July 7

Sarasota Art Museum (entrance at 1001 S. Tamiami Trail, Sarasota, FL 34236)

Click here for more information.

This exhibition will feature work from ten nationally and internationally renowned Hermitage alumni artists: Diana Al-Hadid, Sanford Biggers (2010 Hermitage Greenfield Prize winner), Chitra Ganesh, Todd Gray, Trenton Doyle Hancock (2013 Hermitage Greenfield Prize winner), Michelle Lopez, Ted Riederer, the late John Sims, Kukuli Velarde, and William Villalongo. A key factor these ten artists have in common is that over the past two decades, each has been a Fellow at the Hermitage Artist Retreat on Manasota Key — a unique experience that contributed to each of their creative processes in a variety of ways. Overseen by guest curator and former Hermitage Curatorial Council member Dan Cameron, Impact represents the first major exhibition in collaboration between the Hermitage and Sarasota Art Museum. The exhibit will feature work across a range of media, including sculpture, painting, installation, video, photography, printmaking, ceramics, textiles, and social practice. Sanford Biggers, a distinguished Hermitage alumnus and internationally renowned artist, is also now a member of the Hermitage’s National Curatorial Council and was a featured guest speaker at the 2023 Hermitage Greenfield Prize Dinner.

A longtime member of the Hermitage’s Curatorial Council, Dan Cameron is a curator of contemporary art who also writes about art, teaches and lectures about art, makes art, serves on art-related juries and boards, and advises both public and private collections. He has lived in Manhattan since 1979, although at times he has also been based in New Orleans and Long Beach. Throughout his 40-plus year career, Dan has steadfastly championed both the unexpected and the under-recognized. In 1982, he was the first American curator to organize a museum exhibition on LGBTQ art, and in 2008 he launched the Prospect New Orleans triennial in the wake of Hurricane Katrina. Along the way, he has curated international biennials in Istanbul, Taipei, Ecuador, and Orange County, California, as well as retrospectives of such esteemed artists as Carolee Schneemann, Paul McCarthy, Peter Saul, William Kentridge, Faith Ringgold, David Wojnarowicz, Marcel Odenbach, Pierre et Gilles, Cildo Meireles, and Martin Wong. As part of the Getty Foundation’s Pacific Standard Time initiative in 2017, the Palm Springs Art Museum hosted Dan’s exhibition “Kinesthesia: Latin American Kinetic Art 1954-1969.” Dan’s core connection with art stems from its capacity to expand our collective awareness of ourselves, the world around us, and the way that humans invent ways to communicate essential values with one another. Whether in the cause of furthering social justice or challenging art history, Dan believes that the artist’s fundamental obligation to civilization is to push sensorial and perceptual engagement into new, fruitful realms of engagement. The curator’s role is to provide an appropriate platform and context for that expression, and to provide a public forum for viewers to more fully immerse themselves in the experience, and for the artists to engage in critical dialogue about the art and its meaning.

Hermitage Fellow Diana Al-Hadid is known for her practice that examines the historical frameworks and perspectives that continue to shape discourse on culture and materials today. With a practice spanning sculpture, wall reliefs, and works on paper, Al-Hadid weaves together enigmatic narratives that draw inspiration from both ancient and modern civilizations.

Sanford Biggers was the first recipient of the Hermitage Greenfield Prize in the discipline of Visual Art in 2010. His work is an interplay of narrative, perspective, and history that speaks to current social, political, and economic happenings while also examining the contexts that bore them. His diverse practice positions him as a collaborator with the past through explorations of often-overlooked cultural and political narratives from American history. Working with antique quilts that echo rumors of their use as signposts on the Underground Railroad, he engages these legends and contributes to this narrative by drawing and painting directly onto them.

Across a 20-year practice, Hermitage Fellow Chitra Ganesh has developed an expansive body of work rooted in drawing and painting, which has evolved to encompass animations, wall drawings, collages, computer generated imagery, video, and sculpture. Through studies in literature, semiotics, social theory, science fiction, and historical and mythic texts, Ganesh attempts to reconcile representations of femininity, sexuality, and power absent from the artistic and literary canons.

Hermitage Fellow Todd Gray works in photography, performance, and sculpture. Gray’s work is represented in numerous museum collections. He works between Los Angeles and Ghana, where he explores the diasporic dislocations and cultural connections which link Western hegemony with West Africa.

Trenton Doyle Hancock won the Hermitage Greenfield Prize in 2013. Influenced by the history of painting, especially Abstract Expressionism, he transforms traditionally formal decisions — such as the use of color, language, and pattern — into opportunities to create new characters, develop sub-plots, and convey symbolic meaning. Balancing moral dilemmas with wit and a musical sense of language and color, Hancock’s works create a painterly space of psychological dimensions. Trenton Doyle Hancock was the winner of the 2013 Hermitage Greenfield Prize for Visual Art.

Michelle Lopez is a Hermitage Fellow, interdisciplinary sculptor, and installation artist. As a builder, conceptualist, and manipulator of materials, Lopez inventively explores cultural phenomenon, stretching to their limits the industrial processes that craft consumerism in its many forms. Lopez examines collapsed political and social structures by inverting cultural tropes through the process of building, exploiting industrial materials to expose the hidden boundaries of embedded societal constructions.

A “one-time refugee from punk and sometime band member,” Hermitage Fellow Ted Riederer has armed himself with painting supplies, electric guitars, amplifiers, old LPs, record players, drum kits, hard disk recorders, photography equipment, a vinyl record lathe, and long-stemmed roses as he’s ambled artistically from the Americas to the Antipodes. His work has been shown nationally and internationally.

John Sims, a Detroit native and Hermitage Fellow, was an interdisciplinary conceptual artist who created multimedia projects spanning the areas of mathematics, art, text, performance, and political-media activism. His main projects were informed by the vocabulary of mathematical structure, the politics of sacred symbols and poetic reflections. As the former coordinator of mathematics at Ringling College of Art and Design in Sarasota, Florida, he designed a visual mathematics curriculum for artists and visual thinkers. John Sims died in 2022 at the age of 54.

Hermitage Fellow Kukuli Velerde left Peru as an adult, already aware of its racial, social, cultural and economic climate. Latin contemporary culture, its finest expression: family ties, and herself as result, are together the frame within which her work evolves. Velerde’s mediums include paining on aluminum plates and ceramic installations.

Hermitage Fellow William Villalongo’s work is concerned with stories and images of time and change in the arch of inhumanity to humanity that has marked the black experience shaping his subject and study as an artist. He often works in series where he looks for frameworks to make these concerns visible. A figure, a still life, a painting, a drawing or a sculpture are his vessels for information and sites to produce meaning.

 

Apr
21
Sun
“The Truth of the Night Sky: A Hermitage Collaboration” @ Sarasota Art Museum
Apr 21 @ 10:00 am – Sep 29 @ 5:00 pm
"The Truth of the Night Sky: A Hermitage Collaboration" @ Sarasota Art Museum

“The Truth of the Night Sky: A Hermitage Collaboration”
featuring Hermitage Fellows Anne Patterson and Patrick Harlin

Presented in partnership with Sarasota Art Museum

Sunday April 21 to  Sunday September 29

Sarasota Art Museum (entrance at 1001 S. Tamiami Trail, Sarasota, FL 34236)

Click here for more information.

The Truth of the Night Sky, a Hermitage collaboration, is the second exhibition of Hermitage alumni premiering at Sarasota Art Museum this spring – opening on April 21, 2024 and remaining on display through September 29, 2024. After meeting while in residence at the Hermitage Artist Retreat ten years ago and building on their friendship and collaboration, multidisciplinary visual artist Anne Patterson and composer / soundscape artist Patrick Harlin have joined forces to develop this one-of-a-kind immersive experience. Patterson, who is familiar to Sarasota audiences from previous exhibitions at The Ringling Museum and whose “Divine Pathways” is currently represented in New York at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine, is widely celebrated for her grand environments that immerse the viewer and surround the senses. A distinguished Hermitage alumna with an impressive background in immersive exhibitions and theatrical design, Anne Patterson has frequently collaborated with musicians, including fellow Hermitage alum Patrick Harlin, to design mesmerizing environments. For this collaborative project, Patterson and Harlin are expanding upon Harlin’s original composition Earthrise (2022), an orchestral piece inspired by the eponymous photograph (1968) taken by Apollo 8 astronaut William Anders on humanity’s first-ever trip around the moon. The original composition by Patrick Harlin, who was also the very first recipient of the Hermitage Prize in Composition at the Aspen Music Festival, will play as visitors pass through the galleries. The exhibition will feature several works by Patterson, as well as a suspended tree and her signature satin ribbon installation work. With each step, visitors will travel imaginatively through space and time. Of their time at the Hermitage Artist Retreat, Patterson and Harlin are fond of saying that their experience was invaluable to their craft and their collaboration, allowing them to achieve new heights, find a unique environmental inspiration, and explore new possibilities in their work.

Hermitage alumna Anne Patterson is a multidisciplinary artist based in Brooklyn. She recently served as a juror for the 2023 Hermitage Greenfield Prize. Her body of work consists of paintings, sculptures, and large-scale multimedia installations that combine sculpture, architecture, lighting, video, music, and scent. Drawing from her background in theater and opera set design, she uses these modalities to create an artistic practice, hovering somewhere between the visual, experiential and immersive. Patterson’s large-scale installations have filled cathedrals, office buildings, and galleries across the country with miles of fabric, aluminum ribbon, and metal birds. Her most recent installation, “Divine Pathways” was created in concert with communities and organizations across the Morningside Heights neighborhood in New York City and is now on display at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine. “Ascendant Light,” commissioned by Capital One as the centerpiece of their new corporate headquarters, is made of hundreds of hand plotted ribbons over six stories. Other recent commissions include “Art for Earth,” commissioned by the fashion house Ermenegildo Zegna, was made of thousands of lengths of fabric repurposed from Zegna fabrics. Anne has exhibited widely including solo exhibitions at The Ringling Museum and Alfstad & Contemporary. Her work has been shown at The Trapholt Museum, Denmark; Cristina Grajales, New York; Scope Art Fair, Miami; Aqua Art Fair, Miami; Building Bridges Art Exchange, Los Angeles; Valerie Dillon Gallery, New York; Denise Bibro, New York; Cade Tompkins Projects, Providence, RI and One Twelve Gallery, Atlanta. Her paintings and sculptures are in private, public, and corporate collections across the USA (Tishman Speyer, Tribune Media, Nortek, New York Presbyterian Hospital, Memorial Sloan Kettering Hospital, Rhode Island Blue Cross) and in London. Anne’s theatrical and symphonic partnerships have included Lincoln Center, Brooklyn Academy of Music, Arena Stage, The Wilma Theater, The Kennedy Center, Alliance Theater and prestigious symphonies throughout the country (San Francisco, Atlanta, Philadelphia, Chicago, Seattle).  Patterson was the 2014 and 2016 CODAaward Winner for Liturgical Art and received a Creative Capital Award in 2008. She is a proud Fellow of the Hermitage Artist’s Retreat. In Sarasota, her work has been exhibited at The Ringling Museum and commissioned by the Community Foundation of Sarasota County. Patterson received her B.A. of Architecture from Yale University and her M.F.A. in Theater Design from The Slade School of Art, London UK.

Hermitage Fellow Patrick Harlin’s “aesthetics capture a sense of tradition and innovation” (The New York Times). He is the inaugural recipient of the Hermitage Prize in Composition at the Aspen Music Festival, which offered a residency at the Hermitage Artist Retreat in Manasota Key, Florida. Harlin’s music is permeated by classical, jazz, and electronic music traditions, all underpinned with a love and respect for the great outdoors. His works have been performed on subscription series concerts by the St. Louis Symphony, Kansas City Symphony, the Rochester and Calgary Philharmonic Orchestras, Collegium Cincinnati, and Calidore String Quartet, among others. CD recordings include Wilderness Anthology by the Kinetic Ensemble and American Rapture on the Grammy-nominated album by the Rochester Philharmonic. Patrick was the inaugural composer in residence with the Lansing Symphony Orchestra (2019-2023.) To date, he is the only artist-recipient of a DOW Sustainability Fellowship. While at the Hermitage, Harlin met visual artist Anne Patterson, and they have been collaborating since, including the work The Art of Flight with Anne’s art installation “Murmuration.” Patrick’s interdisciplinary research in soundscape ecology — a field that aims to better understand ecosystems through sound — has taken him to imperiled regions around the world, including the Amazon rainforest and the Book Cliffs of Utah. His baseline recordings for ecological impact studies are also the fodder for artistic inspiration.  Patrick’s research on the importance of soundscapes has been supported by a Graham Sustainability Institute Doctoral Fellowship, Rackham Fellowship, Theodore Presser Award, and private support. The resulting works, the Wilderness Anthology draw parallels between the sounds of the natural world and those of the concert hall, seeking to bring awareness to the importance of sound in our environment. Patrick grew up in Seattle, holds a doctorate in music composition from the University of Michigan, and currently resides in Ann Arbor.

 

Jun
26
Wed
“Stealing the Show: Broadway, Beach, and Beyond” @ Hermitage Beach
Jun 26 @ 6:30 pm – 7:30 pm

“Stealing the Show: Broadway, Beach, and Beyond”
with Hermitage Fellow Leslie Rodriguez Kritzer

Wednesday, June 26 at 6:30pm

Leslie Rodriguez Kritzer’s Hermitage Residency generously sponsored by the Huisking Fund of the Community Foundation of Sarasota County.

Presented in Partnership with our regional theater collaborators:
Asolo Rep, The Sarasota Players, Urbanite Theatre, Van Wezel Performing Arts Hall, Venice Theatre, and Westcoast Black Theatre Troupe

Hermitage Beach (entrance at 6660 Manasota Key Rd, Englewood, FL 34223)

Register here.
Registration is required. $5 per person.

Returning Hermitage Fellow Leslie Rodriguez Kritzer is a 2024 Tony Award nominee for her recent performance in Spamalot, where The New York Times noted that “she essentially steals the show.” Broadway audiences have celebrated Kritzer for years thanks to her powerhouse voice, her pitch-perfect comic timing, and her iconic roles in Broadway’s Beetlejuice, Something Rotten!, Legally Blonde, The Robber Bridegroom, and more. TV audiences have also come to know Leslie, notably through her memorable turn as Carol Burnett on the series finale of “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel.” Now, Hermitage audiences will get to know Leslie as a gifted writer, composer, and lyricist who has been developing her own original projects right here along the inspirational shores of the Hermitage. Join this quadruple-plus threat for a bit of both worlds: the songs you know and the next great work of American theater.

Hermitage Fellow Leslie Rodriguez Kritzer is a 2024 Tony Award Nominee for her showstopping turn as ‘Lady of the Lake’ in the Broadway revival of Spamalot. She previously starred on Broadway as Delia in Beetlejuice, for which she received Drama Desk, Drama League, and Chita Rivera Award nominations. Additional Broadway credits include Something Rotten!, Elf, Sondheim on Sondheim, Legally Blonde, A Catered Affair (Drama Desk nomination) and Hairspray. Off-Broadway: The Robber Bridegroom (Lucille Lortel Award and Drama League Award), Gigantic (Lucille Lortel nomination), ROOMS: A Rock Romance (Outer Critics Circle nomination), and others. She can be heard on several original casting recordings. TV: “Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” (as Carol Burnett in the Series Finale) “The First Lady,” “Bridge & Tunnel,” “New Amsterdam,” “Difficult People,” “Kevin Can Wait,” “Younger,” “Vinyl,” and “Law & Order: SVU.” Sarasota audiences have previously seen Leslie perform alongside Andy Sandberg in the Hermitage 20th Anniversary Concert (Van Wezel Hall) and at the 2023 Hermitage Greenfield Prize Dinner (Ringling Museum). @lesliekritzer

Jun
28
Fri
“We Were the Universe” @ Bookstore1
Jun 28 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
"We Were the Universe" @ Bookstore1

“We Were the Universe”
with Hermitage Fellow Kimberly King Parsons

Presented in partnership with Bookstore1.

Kimberly King Parsons’ Hermitage Residency generously sponsored by Robyn & Charles Citrin.

Friday, June 28 at 6pm

Bookstore1 (entrance at 117 S Pineapple Ave, Sarasota, FL 34236)

Register here.
Registration is required. $5 per person.

From the author of the short story collection Black Light (National Book Award longlist) comes the highly anticipated debut novel We Were the Universe. Set in Texas and through the stream-of-consciousness narration from Kit, Hermitage Fellow Kimberly King Parsons “has created a character so appealing in her cheerful brokenness that you won’t want to leave her side for a minute.” (Kirkus Review) From trips to Oregon to acid trips, life, death, and rock’n roll, Parsons’ remarkable style has readers turning pages and discovering entirely new frames of mind. Hear selections of the novel read by this Hermitage author and dive into conversation about the writing process in Bookstore1’s intimate loft space.

Hermitage Fellow Kimberly King Parsons is the author of the forthcoming novel We Were the Universe and the short story collection Black Light, which was longlisted for the National Book Award and the Story Prize. A recipient of Fellowships from the Hermitage Artist Retreat, Yaddo, and Columbia University, Parsons won the 2020 National Magazine Award for “Foxes,” a story published in The Paris Review. She lives in Portland, Oregon with her partner and children. Born in Lubbock, Texas, Parsons earned a BA in English and an MA in Literary Studies from the University of Texas at Dallas. She then moved to New York, where she earned an MFA in Fiction from Columbia and served as the editor-in-chief of Columbia: A Journal of Literature and Art. Parsons’ book reviews and interviews have appeared in Bookforum, BOMB, Time Out New York, The Millions, and elsewhere. Parsons’ collection Black Light was a finalist for the 2020 Edmund White Award for Debut Fiction, the 2020 Texas Institute of Letters Best Work of First Fiction Award, and the 2020 Oregon Book Award.

Jul
12
Fri
“2024 Hermitage STARs” @ Hermitage Campus
Jul 12 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm
"2024 Hermitage STARs" @ Hermitage Campus

“2024 Hermitage STARs”
with 5 Fantastic Florida Arts Teachers

Presented in partnership with Florida Alliance for Arts Education, Boys and Girls Club of Sarasota and Desoto County, and Englewood YMCA

Friday, July 12 at 2pm

Hermitage Campus (entrance at 6660 Manasota Key Rd, Englewood, FL 34223)

Register here.
Registration is required. $5 per person.

Now in its fourteenth season, the State Teaching Artist Residency (STAR) at the Hermitage Artist Retreat is designed to nourish the artist within Florida’s Arts Teachers. Proudly serving teachers from all across the state, this partnership with the Florida Alliance for Arts Education is one of the few of its kind in the country and offers five educators two weeks of inspiration on the Hermitage’s historical campus. Culminating in a free public sharing with the Gulf Coast community, the selected teachers span artistic disciplines and offer insights into their creative practice to audiences of all ages. Selected teachers will be announced at a later date.

Jul
25
Thu
“Interrupted History” @ Hermitage Beach
Jul 25 @ 6:30 pm – 7:30 pm
“Interrupted History” @ Hermitage Beach

“Interrupted History”
with Hermitage Fellows Yasi Alipour, Jeffery Renard Allen and Sanderia Faye Smith 

Thursday, July 25 at 6:30pm

Hermitage Beach (entrance at 6660 Manasota Key Rd, Englewood, FL 34223)

Register here.
Registration is required. $5 per person.

In the works created by these remarkable Hermitage artists, time collapses and worlds expand; the future is present and history is interrupted. Both work on paper to create narrative, but Jeffery Renard Allen uses letters while Yasi Alipour prefers lines and intricate patterns. Splitting time between New York and Johannesburg, Allen is an award-winning author of six books, including the critically acclaimed debut Song of the Shank. His latest work “Fat Time and Other Stories” is a collection of short works described by The New York Times as a “fierce itching dazzle.” Alipour, a celebrated visual artist interested in paper, politics, and performance, explores systems of math and history in her work. Informed by her time studying at the University of Tehran, intricately folded pages take on three-dimensional presence when imbued with her intuitive and highly technical art. Hear from both of these artists about why they make the work they make, and what they hope an audience will see and hear when they encounter it.

Hermitage Fellow Jeffery Renard Allen is the award-winning author of six books of fiction and poetry, including the celebrated novel Song of the Shank, which was a front-page review in both The New York Times “Book Review” and The San Francisco Chronicle. Allen’s other accolades include The Chicago Tribune‘s Heartland Prize for Fiction, The Chicago Public Library’s Twenty-First Century Award, the Ernest J. Gaines Award for Literary Excellence, a grant from Creative Capital, a Whiting Writers’ Award, a Guggenheim fellowship, residencies at the Bellagio Center, Ucross, The Hermitage, VCCA, Monson Arts, and Jentel Arts, and fellowships at The Center for Scholars and Writers, the Johannesburg Institute for Advanced Studies, and the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture. He was a finalist for both the PEN/Faulkner Award and the Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Fiction. Allen is the founder and editor of Taint Taint Taint magazine and is the Africa Editor for The Evergreen Review. His latest books are the short story collection Fat Time and the memoir An Unspeakable Hope, the latter co-authored with Leon Ford. Making his home in both New York and Johannesburg, Allen is at work on several projects, including a two-volume memoir entitled Mother-Wit and a short story collection called Try Me. Find out more about him at www.WriterJefferyRenardAllen.com.

Hermitage Fellow Yasi Alipour is an Iranian artist, writer, and folder who currently lives in Brooklyn and wonders about paper, politics, and performance. She is a teacher at Columbia University and SVA and is currently a resident at the Sharpe Walentas Studio program. She uses text and intricately folded pieces of paper to explore systems of math and history. In her series “As Dreams Become History,” Alipour asked Iranian friends born after the revolution to share secondhand memories of that decade shared by family and older friends. She paired these texts with sheets of paper printed with black ink and then folded them into geometric tessellations referencing Middle Eastern abstraction. Her research-based practice spans sculpture, installation, performance, drawing, writing, lectures, and experimentation, probing personal history to parse issues around political instability and interrupted histories. Columbia University, MFA 2018. For further information, please visit YasamanAlipour.com.

 

Aug
9
Fri
“Translation-Traducción” @ Hermitage Beach
Aug 9 @ 6:30 pm – 7:30 pm
“Translation-Traducción” @ Hermitage Beach

“Translation-Traducción”
with Hermitage Fellows Mónica Lavín and D.P. Snyder

Friday, August 9 at 6:30pm

Hermitage Beach (entrance at 6660 Manasota Key Rd, Englewood, FL 34223)

Register here.
Registration is required. $5 per person.

The relationship of author and translator is uniquely collaborative and somewhat elusive. When done right, two writers’ literary DNA recombine to create not mere reproductions but wholly new works. What is the alchemy by which this literary magic takes place? How does such an interchange enrich the work and its readers? In this age of A.I. and ever more present translation technology, Hermitage Fellow Mónica Lavín and her writer-translator collaborator D.P. Snyder offer audiences a chance to explore the Spanish-English literary dynamic and the deeply human activity of understanding another person’s voice. Join these two gifted writers for insight into the intimate, generous, and empathetic act of literary translation.

Hermitage Fellow Mónica Lavín, hailing from Mexico City, is the author of nine books of short stories, notably “Ruby Tuesday no ha muerto” (Gilberto Owen Literary National Prize, 1996); “Uno no sabe” (2003, Antonin Artaud award finalist); “La corredora de Cuemanco y el aficionado a Schubert” (Punto de Lectura, 2008), “Manual para enamorarse” (2011), and “La casa chica” (Planeta: 2012). She has written ten novels including: Café cortado (Best Book of the Year, Premio Narrativa de Colima 2001); La más faulera (Grijalbo), a best-selling novel for young readers; Despertar los apetitos (Alfaguara, 2005); Yo, la peor (Grijalbo, 2009; winner, Premio Iberoamericano de Novela Elena Poniatowska); Doble filo (PRHM, 2014); and Cuando te hablen de amor (Planeta, 2017). Her stories appear in anthologies both in Mexico and around the world, and she is a fellow at the Hermitage Artist Retreat, Banff Centre for the Arts, and Yaddo. She writes for the Universal newspaper and interviews for Public Television in Mexico. She belongs to the Sistema Nacional de Creadores (FONCA) and is a professor in the Creative Writing Department of the Universidad Autónoma in México City.

D.P. Snyder specializing in short fiction, essays, interviews, and literary criticism. Currently at work on a novel, she is also a skilled translator, focusing primarily on literature from Mexico, Colombia, the Caribbean, and Spain, with a focus on literary works by women and works of social importance. As a former singer-songwriter, she also translates lyrics, principally for The New York Festival of Song. She was the Co-Director of The Latin American Workshop in New York City, a non-profit cultural organization that produced over three-hundred art exhibits, readings, and crossover concerts featuring artists like Philip Glass, Tico Da Costa, Pete Seeger, León Gieco, Papo Gely, Luis “El Terror” Días, and David Byrne, among many others under her tenure. She is a member of the American Literary Translators Association (ALTA), and serves on the Board of Editors at Reading in Translation and on the Translation Committee of PEN America. Snyder received a B.A. in Language and Literature from Yale University and an M.F.A. in Creative Writing from Sewanee: The University of the South and is an alumna of the Under the Volcano writing community in Tepoztlán, México. She has studied narrative art and poetry with Mexican writers Mónica Lavín, Jaime Mesa, and David Huerta.

 

 

Aug
23
Fri
“The Lazour Brothers: A Lifelong Collabrotion” @ Hermitage Beach
Aug 23 @ 6:30 pm – 7:30 pm
“The Lazour Brothers: A Lifelong Collabrotion” @ Hermitage Beach

“The Lazour Brothers: A Lifelong Collabrotion”
with 2024 Hermitage Greenfield Prize Finalists Daniel and Patrick Lazour

Friday, August 23 at 6:30pm

Hermitage Beach (entrance at 6660 Manasota Key Rd, Englewood, FL 34223)

Register here.
Registration is required. $5 per person.

Musical theater has a long history of storied collaborators: Rodgers & Hammerstein, Kander & Ebb, Ahrens & Flaherty, Pasek & Paul, and now Daniel & Patrick Lazour. Finalists for the 2024 Hermitage Greenfield Prize, the Lazour Brothers are already Jonathan Larson Grant and Richard Rodgers Award recipients, and their works have been recognized by such prestigious institutions as American Repertory Theater and Lincoln Center. Blending cultures and weaving stories as eloquently as they meld musical styles, the Lazour Brothers are two of the most innovative and evocative musical storytellers working in the American theater today. Join them to hear selections of past and upcoming works, and to learn what’s next for this energetic duo.

Daniel Lazour & Patrick Lazour, brothers and musical theater writers, were finalists for the 2024 Hermitage Greenfield Prize. Their musical We Live in Cairo premiered at the American Repertory Theater in 2019. Projects in development include a musical adaptation of Ritesh Batra’s film The Lunchbox (Lincoln Center Theater commission) and their sing-along theater experiment about patients and caregivers, Night Side Songs (A.R.T./Philadelphia Theater Company co-production). Their movie musical Challenger: An American Dream is being developed with Bruce Cohen Productions. Original songs by the Lazours can be heard on their independently released albums: Freres, Flap My Wings (Songs from We Live in Cairo), Beth’s Homemade Cowboy Breakfast, and Lullabies. They are Jonathan Larson Grant and Richard Rodgers Award recipients; Hermitage Artist Retreat, MacDowell, and Yaddo Fellows; and New York Theatre Workshop Usual Suspects. Patrick holds a B.A. from Boston College, and Daniel holds a B.A. from Columbia University.